You don’t have to be an Interdisciplinary Studies student to take gender-related courses; you can incorporate them into your current degree plan with the approval of your academic advisor. You may also be interested in adding a Gender Studies minor (18 semester credit hours) to your major. Some courses are offered by two schools and will appear under both.

Spring '21 Gender-Related Courses

List of Gender-Related Courses by School

 

School of Arts and Humanities

HIST 3302 / GST 3302 Gender in Western Thought (3 semester hours) Identifies gendered approaches within the history of ideas, including philosophy, theology, and literature. Universal truths about human nature, particularly with regard to sex and gender, are located within the intellectual milieu of various writers and within the larger body of Western thought.

HIST 2384 U.S. Women from Settlement to Present (3 semester hours) A survey of the changing social, political, and economic roles of American women. Particular attention will be paid to the diversity of women’s roles, focusing on how women of different races, classes, and sexualities interpreted their “American experience.”

HIST 3324 Women in Modern European Society (3 semester hours) An historical examination of the varied experiences of European women, focusing on work, family life, political action, sexuality, and cultural expression. May emphasize early modern or modern period. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 hours maximum).

HIST 4360 Topics in American Women’s History (3 semester hours) Subject matter will vary from semester to semester and may include Women and the American Frontier, Popular Culture and Mass Media, and American Religious Societies. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum).

HIST 4379 Topics in Women's and Gender History (3 semester credit hours) May be repeated as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). Prerequisite: Completion of a 060 core course.

PHIL 4333 Feminist Philosophy (3 semester credit hours) An examination of major writings by feminist philosophers and theorists. This course may examine the historical development of feminism and/or explore major feminist topics such as oppression, sexism, embodiment, and gender. Questions to be pursued might include: What is it be a woman? Are women oppressed? How do institutions pertaining to marriage, motherhood, and sex shape the lives of women? In what ways might feminist concerns intersect with current issues in philosophy of race, queer theory, and philosophy of disability? May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). Prerequisite: Any previous PHIL course.

School of Arts, Technology and Emerging Media

ATCM 3321 Networked Identities (3 semester credit hours) This course considers digital media and identities, with a focus on gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, disability, class, age, and/or nationality. Topics will include how such identities are represented in media and how people use media to reshape such representation. Prerequisite: ATCM 3320

ATCM 4322 Disability, Technology, and Media (3 semester hours) This course provides a critical understanding of disability in relation to technology and media. Students will investigate how social constructions of ability and disability influence technology development and media representations; the relationship between the attention economy and representations of bodies, illness, health, and minds; the role of media and technology in constructing norms; and visual rhetorics of the abnormal. Prerequisite: ATCM 3321 or instructor consent required.

ATCM 4323 Feminism, Technology, and the Media (3 semester hours) This course examines feminist approaches to critical technology and media studies. Students learn the history of women in technology fields; feminist approaches to theorizing the relationship between social constructions of gender and technology and media development and use; media's use in the dissemination and development of feminist thought and practices; and the articulation of gender in such media as film, television, and social media. Prerequisite: ATCM 3321 or instructor consent required.

ATCM 4325 Race, Technology, and Media (3 semester hours) In this course, students learn about media and technology's inscription within the histories of Western racism and colonialism; how structural racism affects technology development, the media industries, and media representations; and how race is articulated in media and technology, including in film, television, social media, and videogames. Prerequisite: ATCM 3321 or instructor consent required.

School of Behavioral & Brain Sciences


PSY 3324 / GST 3301 Psychology of Gender (3 semester hours) Examines gender as it is expressed in the personality of the individual and in the social relations of dyads and groups. Topics include gender identity, sexual orientation, gender differences in intellectual abilities and personality characteristics, gender as it is expressed in friendships, marriage, and sexuality, and cultural gender stereotypes as they affect individual psychology and personal relationships.

CLDP 3338 / PSY 3338 Adolescence (3 semester hours) Covers physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional development of adolescents. Topics include puberty, identity development, family processes, peers, schools, achievement and adolescent problems.

PSY 4324 The Psychology of Prejudice (3 semester hours) Examines prejudice and discrimination, applying social-psychological theory and research to various social and historical issues, including stereotypes and prejudice in the media, old-fashioned and modern prejudice, sexism, heterosexism, classism, acculturation, inter-group contact, and the application of theory to policies including public housing, Affirmative Action, drug laws and welfare.

CLDP 4345 / PSY 4345 Violence in the Family (3 semester hours) Explores the area of family violence with primary emphasis on the problems of spouse abuse and child abuse. Analysis of each of these areas of family violence focuses specifically on the epidemiology of the problem, characteristics of the families, etiological theories, and treatment approaches.

PSY 4346 Human Sexuality (3 semester hours) Covers a wide range of issues concerning behavioral and biological aspects of sexuality. Topics include how to judge sexual research, values and sex, love and intimacy, male and female sexual anatomy and physiology, sexually transmitted diseases, patterns of sexual response, sexual problems and therapies, the development of sexuality, sexual orientation, reproductive sexuality, forcible sexual behavior, and social issues in sexuality.

CLDP 4347 / PSY 4347 Marriage and Family Psychology (3 semester hours) Examines family life styles from socio-psychological viewpoint with stress on personal awareness, growth and satisfaction in interpersonal relations. Research topics include dating, mate selection, communication, sexual adjustment, parenting, cohesion and adaptability, and divorce.

School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences

CRIM 3324 Gender, Crime, and Justice (3 semester hours) Analysis of the role of gender in crime and in the justice system. The emphasis is on gender differences in the commission of crime and the types of crimes committed, criminal justice processing, and the employment of women in the criminal justice professions.
PA 3379 Diversity in the Public Sector (3 semester hours) This course will focus on diversity beyond just race/ethnicity and gender, and examine dimensions of sexual orientation, skill level, physical ability, communication styles, and multi-generations in the workplace. Understanding diversity and learning how to manage its complexity is the key focus of this class. Students will examine the importance of multiple cultures in public organization in work teams and discuss the challenges that come with multiculturalism. Social interaction that contribute to the understanding of difference groups in diverse settings are examined. (Same as SOC 3379)

PPOL 4314 - Family Violence and Public Policy (3 semester credit hours) This is an advanced topics course summarizing the most recent research, theories, and methods in studying family violence and providing in-depth definitions and discussions about some of the most prevalent forms of family violence, prevention and legal initiatives, and the impact of public policies on this critical public health issue in the United States today. It offers a critical analysis of theory, methodology, empirical scholarship, best practices, and public policies surrounding domestic violence, child abuse and neglect, parricide, elder abuse, stalking and sexual assault, and questions the myths surrounding the cycle of violence in American families.

PSCI 3353 Law and Gender (3 semester hours) Examines how legal equality and gender discrimination have been defined, implemented and challenged in both international and U.S. law and policy. We will examine such topics as the development of international norms of women’s rights, hurdles in implementing legal norms in the domestic context, and the factors that influence compliance. We will examine both case studies and empirical research, from a U.S. and a comparative perspective.

PSCI 4357 Human Rights (3 semester hours) This course focuses on the development of norms involving international human rights and law as well as major and competing theories that sometimes weigh against the development of universal human rights. Also examines the effectiveness of the courts and law, including international courts and truth commissions, in the area of human rights.

PSCI 4364 Civil Rights Law and Society (3 semester hours) Examines the development of civil rights law, and how social ideologies are reflected and reproduced in race and sex discrimination law. Explores how power is exercised through law, and how legal change is pursued as a strategy for social reform. Topics include antislavery and the judicial process, the Reconstruction Amendments, the role of the Supreme Court in U.S. society, school segregation cases, and hate speech.

PSCI 4377 Women and Politics (3 semester credit hours) This course describes, explains, and evaluates the meanings of politics and the private-public distinction involving politics; the participation of women in politics as voters and candidates in elections and as leaders in legislative, executive and other offices; and the consequences of women’s participation for gender equity, political representation, and public policy. (3-0) T

SOC 3343 Sociology of the Family (3 semester hours) Trends in family life are examined with special attention to how these relate to changes in men’s and women’s roles. Topics include sex-role socialization, division of labor in the household, sexuality, emotional aspects of marriage, marital power and decision making, and divorce.

SOC 3352 Sex, Gender and Society (3 semester credit hours) This course explores how sexuality is perceived, defined, and experienced in the context of society. How sexuality influences our lives, is reflected in social norms, attitudes and beliefs, through public and private policies and practices, and the social institutions is also investigated. This class also focuses on how prevalent gender differences really are in our society and examines the social construction of gender. (3-0)

SOC 3379 Diversity in the Public Sector (3 semester hours) This course will focus on diversity beyond just race/ethnicity and gender, and examine dimensions of sexual orientation, skill level, physical ability, communication styles, and multi-generations in the workplace. Understanding diversity and learning how to manage its complexity is the key focus of this class. Students will examine the importance of multiple cultures in public organization in work teams and discuss the challenges that come with multiculturalism. Social interaction that contribute to the understanding of difference groups in diverse settings are examined. (Same as SOC 3379)

SOC 4375 Gender and Work (3 semester hours) A sociological analysis of historical trends and current patterns of gender inequality in paid and domestic work; examination of theories and research related to the role of gender in shaping labor market opportunities, experiences, and rewards; identification of various forms of workplace discrimination and potential remedies.

School of Interdisciplinary Studies

AMS 2300 American Popular Culture (3 semester hours) Examines American culture historically through some of its most popular cultural forms: fiction, film, magazines, advertising, music, sports, television and media. Considers the economics of cultural production, ways of critically reading popular texts, and how consumers make use of popular culture. Pays particular attention to the ways gender, race, and class influence how popular texts are created and consumed.

AMS 2341 American Studies for the Twenty-First Century (3 semester hours) An introduction to American cultural studies, its theories, and methodologies. Topics may include: religion and politics; transnationalism; gender and sexuality; class, labor and consumption; race and ethnicity. Develops students’ abilities to interpret cultural texts, to make and evaluate historical and literary arguments, and to situate contemporary cultural debates in larger historical and theoretical frames.

AMS 4360 / GST 4360 Gender and Alcohol in America (3 semester hours) Examines women’s historical role as crusaders against alcohol and identifies how the role of reformer was gendered. Identifies the genesis of the disease concept of alcoholism and how it was applied to men and women in different ways. Examines gendered ideas about male and female drinking and how they are represented in popular culture, literature, and film.

AMS 4379 Topics in American Studies (3 semester hours) May be used if topic is relevant to Gender Studies and/or gender issues.

BIS 4V04 Internship (1-6 semester hours) Students undertake a new learning experience at a faculty-supervised work situation in business, government, or social service agency, arts institution, or other setting appropriate to the student’s concentration. Sites may be local, out of state, or abroad. An internship provides exposure to a professional working environment, application of theory to working realities, and an opportunity to test skills and clarify goals in a specific field. Experience gained may also serve as a work credential after graduation. Course requirements include writing a journal and research paper connecting theory to practice. May be repeated for credit (6 semester credit hours maximum). Instructor consent required. M (when related to Gender Studies)

GST 2300 Introduction to Gender Studies (3 semester hours) An introduction to the way gender shapes individuals, social institutions and culture. Examines gender, class, sexuality, race/ethnicity, and nationality as interactive systems. Topics include biological arguments about gender and sexuality; the cultural construction of gender; the psychology of sex roles; the ways gender shapes families, workplaces and other social institutions. M (required course for minor)

GST 3301 / PSY 3324 Psychology of Gender (3 semester hours) Examines gender as it is expressed in the personality of the individual and in the social relations of dyads and groups. Topics include gender identity, sexual orientation, gender differences in intellectual abilities and personality characteristics, gender as it is expressed in friendships, marriage, and sexuality, and cultural gender stereotypes as they affect individual psychology and personal relationships.

GST 3302 / HIST 3302 Gender in Western Thought (3 semester hours) Identifies gendered approaches within the history of ideas, including philosophy, theology, and literature. Universal truths about human nature, particularly with regard to sex and gender, are located within the intellectual milieu of various writers and within the larger body of Western thought.

GST 3303 Gender, Society and Politics (3 semester hours) Addresses the influence of gender on the distribution of public goods and the way gender, interacting with race and class, shapes social, political, and economic institutions. Introduces students to traditional notions of rights and citizenship as conceptual underpinnings for contemporary political and legal debates (on welfare, reproductive rights, childcare, job segregation, women in the military, prostitution).

GST 4325 / AMS 4324 Motherhood and the Technological Womb (3 semester hours) Examines the relationship between reproductive technologies and the meanings of motherhood. Investigates the history of reproductive technologies and how various interventions and medical/technological “advances” have influenced the social, emotional, legal, political, and economic dimensions of motherhood and reproduction. Topics include conception and birth control, “test tube” babies, infertility treatments, surrogacy, fetal ultrasound imaging, high-order multiple births, genetic testing, cloning, and ectogenesis (artificial wombs).

GST 4360 / AMS 4360 Gender and Alcohol in America (3 semester hours) Examines women’s historical role as crusaders against alcohol and identifies how the role of reformer was gendered. Identifies the genesis of the disease concept of alcoholism and how it was applied to men and women in different ways. Examines gendered ideas about male and female drinking and how they are represented in popular culture, literature, and film.

GST 4379 Topics in Gender Studies (3 semester hours) May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 hours maximum). GST 4V80 Independent Study (1-6 semester hours) May be repeated for credit. Instructor consent required. (when related to Gender Studies) GST 4381 Senior Honors Research (3 semester hours) Designed for students conducting original research. Instructor consent required. GST 4382 Senior Honors in Gender Studies (3 semester hours) To qualify for magna or summa cum laude if the required number of semester credit hours are taken at UT Dallas. A suitable ranking of this paper/project is required to qualify for honors. Instructors consent required.

HLTH 3306 Gender in Healthcare (3 semester credit hours) The course addresses the significance of gender in many aspects of healthcare. Topics may include: gender in research, differential disease presentations, medications, diet, and treatments. Gender demographics and gender identification will be addressed as well as violence in the home and in the hospital setting. The prerequisite for the course is the completion of a core science course.

HLTH 3310 Health Care Issues: Global Perspectives (3 semester hours) This course examines the social and political aspects of global healthcare issues. Stressing principles of cultural competence, we will examine varying meanings of “health” as well as the range of factors that encourage the health of some and deny it for others. Through a combination of “macro-level” (national and international) as well as “micro-level” (local) analysis, we will enhance our understanding of the global dimensions of health and disease, various strategies of health initiatives, and the short-and-long-term outcomes of both diseases and correlating health care interventions. Topics may include: maternal mortality, HIV, health and environmental hazards, health systems, health and human rights, grass roots initiatives, the millennium development goals, chronic disease and female genital surgeries.

ISIS 3310 Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Multidisciplinary Investigation (3 semester hours) Examines childhood sexual abuse in America using multiple cultural forms: psychiatry, fiction, drama, film, news stories, and television. Considers how the definitions of sexual abuse evolve and change from the late 1800s to the 21st century.

ISIS 3312 Women in Management (3 semester hours) Earnings differences, employment policies, and other critical issues affecting the status of women in managerial and professional positions.

ISIS 4350 International Development: Cultural Impacts (3 semester hours) This interdisciplinary course explores the social, political and economic factors that shape international development. Central course themes include the history of international development, poverty and economics, education, sustainability and the environment.